Miami-Dade judge denies residents’ request to block F1 race

The Miami Grand Prix infield will feature a swimming pool, cabanas and a yacht club.  The Formula 1 race will take place at Hard Rock Stadium from May 6-8, 2022.

The Miami Grand Prix infield will feature a swimming pool, cabanas and a yacht club. The Formula 1 race will take place at Hard Rock Stadium from May 6-8, 2022.

Crypto.com Miami Grand Prix

A Miami-Dade circuit court judge said on Wednesday he would not stand in the way of an upcoming Formula 1 racing event at Hard Rock Stadium after local residents were concerned about the noise.

Judge Alan Fine said he would not hold an injunction hearing until the start of the Miami Grand Prix on May 6, denying a request from Miami Gardens residents who say noise from the event could cause noise. hearing damage.

Fine said any potential harm to residents would be preventable – perhaps by wearing earplugs or staying indoors – and added that the evidence residents have presented on noise levels is “highly speculative. “.

“It is not based on any current Formula 1 noise information,” Fine said.

Fine said the residents’ trial could continue after the May 6-8 event and potentially affect future races. Hard Rock Stadium has a 10-year contract with the City of Miami Gardens to host the Miami Grand Prix each year.

During this year’s race, the judge said, resident and stadium representatives can conduct their own noise measurements to inform their future arguments in court.

“I think it’s important to have an objective measure of what the decibels really are that would affect a complainant,” Fine said.

A Hard Rock Stadium lawyer, Melissa Pallet-Vasquez, told the judge that an agreement was already in place with the City of Miami Gardens to measure noise during stadium events, but Fine ordered that at least one of the measures are taken off-site “at a distance equivalent to the nearest applicant’s home.

The city has yet to issue any special event permits required for the Grand Prix, which is the final hurdle for the event to take place. Residents who filed the lawsuit cited a city ordinance that says events must not “unreasonably disturb the peace and comfort of adjacent residences,” but the law doesn’t define noise levels that would reach that threshold.

Joseph Serota, a city attorney, said Wednesday that the city plans to “comply with the special events permit ordinance,” but did not specify a timeline. The city council supported the event by agreeing to the 10-year agreement which includes a $5 million community benefits package.

This story was originally published April 20, 2022 5:14 p.m.

Aaron Leibowitz is a city government reporter for the Miami Herald. He writes about local politics in every city, town, and city in Miami-Dade County and sometimes beyond.

Comments are closed.